24 7 / 2014

yasboogie:


Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Mom Explains How to Raise a Brilliant Child

Though it might be a bit outdated, the old saying goes: “Behind every successful man, there’s a great woman.” 
In the case of astrophysicist, author, radio and television host Neil deGrasse Tyson, that great woman would be his mother, Sunchita “Toni” Tyson.
In honor of Mother’s Day, Toni Tyson discusses the unique challenges of raising a future astrophysicist in the Bronx.
Ms. Tyson encouraged her son’s scientific aptitude and interests, even when some teachers and professors had low expectations for Neil due to a racist bias.
"It was not easy—it was a full time 24-hour a day job," says Toni. "All three of my children are brown, and they stay brown all year round, and they even get darker in the summertime. We had to make it very, very clear at a very early age that some people are not going to be very nice to them, but it was not their problem but the other person’s problem. When things did occur, we would get onto it immediately.”
When Neil was in junior high school, Toni says that she had read about a scholarship available through the Department of Education. Neil filled out the application, wrote an essay, and had to get three references. According to Toni, one teacher Neil asked for a reference came back with some harsh feedback. 
"When he presented it to the teacher, he said, ‘What makes you think you can get this scholarship?’" says Toni. "Of course, he came home devastated. As a result, he used another teacher. I had gotten vibes from this individual that I did not like during one of the Parent Teacher Association meetings."
That is just one of many stories of struggles Toni discusses in this wide ranging interview Takeaway Host John Hockenberry. Neil deGrasse Tyson himself also joins in the conversation—listen to the full discussion above to hear more.





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yasboogie:

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Mom Explains How to Raise a Brilliant Child

Though it might be a bit outdated, the old saying goes: “Behind every successful man, there’s a great woman.” 

In the case of astrophysicist, author, radio and television host Neil deGrasse Tyson, that great woman would be his mother, Sunchita “Toni” Tyson.

In honor of Mother’s Day, Toni Tyson discusses the unique challenges of raising a future astrophysicist in the Bronx.

Ms. Tyson encouraged her son’s scientific aptitude and interests, even when some teachers and professors had low expectations for Neil due to a racist bias.

"It was not easy—it was a full time 24-hour a day job," says Toni. "All three of my children are brown, and they stay brown all year round, and they even get darker in the summertime. We had to make it very, very clear at a very early age that some people are not going to be very nice to them, but it was not their problem but the other person’s problem. When things did occur, we would get onto it immediately.”

When Neil was in junior high school, Toni says that she had read about a scholarship available through the Department of Education. Neil filled out the application, wrote an essay, and had to get three references. According to Toni, one teacher Neil asked for a reference came back with some harsh feedback. 

"When he presented it to the teacher, he said, ‘What makes you think you can get this scholarship?’" says Toni. "Of course, he came home devastated. As a result, he used another teacher. I had gotten vibes from this individual that I did not like during one of the Parent Teacher Association meetings."

That is just one of many stories of struggles Toni discusses in this wide ranging interview Takeaway Host John Hockenberry. Neil deGrasse Tyson himself also joins in the conversation—listen to the full discussion above to hear more.

(via youngblackandvegan)

24 7 / 2014

"We all have the potential to fall in love a thousand times in our lifetime. It’s easy. The first girl I ever loved was someone I knew in sixth grade. Her name was Missy; we talked about horses. The last girl I love will be someone I haven’t even met yet, probably. They all count. But there are certain people you love who do something else; they define how you classify what love is supposed to feel like. These are the most important people in your life, and you’ll meet maybe four or five of these people over the span of 80 years. But there’s still one more tier to all this; there is always one person you love who becomes that definition. It usually happens retrospectively, but it happens eventually. This is the person who unknowingly sets the template for what you will always love about other people, even if some of these loveable qualities are self-destructive and unreasonable. The person who defines your understanding of love is not inherently different than anyone else, and they’re often just the person you happen to meet the first time you really, really, want to love someone. But that person still wins. They win, and you lose. Because for the rest of your life, they will control how you feel about everyone else."

Chuck Klosterman
Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story (via greedyvegan)

24 7 / 2014

godcipherdevine:

gallifreyglo:

securelyinsecure:

Throwback - Celebrities Recreate Iconic Covers for Ebony Magazine’s 65th Anniversary (2010)

To celebrate its 65th anniversary issue and icons of the past and present, EBONY magazine asked their favorite entertainers to pose in modern-day recreations of those covers for a one-of-a-kind look back at the past.

Featuring: Regina King (as Eartha Kitt), Mary J. Blige (as Diana Ross), Nia Long (as Dorothy Dandridge), John Legend (as Duke Ellington), Lamman Rucker (as Richard Roundtree), Taraji P. Henson (as Diahann Carroll), Blair Underwood (as Sidney Poitier), Jurnee Smollett (as Lena Horne), Usher Raymond (as Sammy Davis, Jr.), and Samuel L. Jackson (as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.), among others.

Love this!

Black Excellence

(via zionsun)

24 7 / 2014

Alicia & Kalinda - drinking

I’m taking responsibility for your irresponsibility.

(Source: mymargulies, via themushroomblues)

24 7 / 2014

featherandarrow:

"I must be a mermaid…I have no fear of depths and a great fear of shallow living." - Anaïs Nin

featherandarrow:

"I must be a mermaid…I have no fear of depths and a great fear of shallow living." - Anaïs Nin

24 7 / 2014

randomverbose:

Dear white people…

I’ll be seeing this opening weekend.

(Source: this-bi-guy)

24 7 / 2014

fleurdulys:

Plaza en Toledo - Dario de Regoyos

fleurdulys:

Plaza en Toledo - Dario de Regoyos

(via cochisejumper)

24 7 / 2014

archatlas:

Cape Romano Dome House

"Built in 1981 on the southern tip of Marco Island, the Dome House is an igloo-like concrete complex made up of white dome chambers, now decaying and slipping slowly into the ocean. Many know about it’s whereabouts but it’s origins were up to debate; from alien to secret cults. In truth, it was built by a retired oil producer and inventor… The structures remain there to this day but are so far from the shore due to changing shoreline, that any attempt at saving them has probably long been lost.” [via]

Images via.

(via cochisejumper)

24 7 / 2014

tarajosu:

Hatshepsut was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Ancient Egypt. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty.

ARTIST: RAIPUN

This is inspiring.

(via cochisejumper)

24 7 / 2014

subtilitas:

Brückner & Brückner - Pope Benedict XVI Pilgrimage museum, Altötting 2009. Via, photos (C) Constantin Meyer

(via cochisejumper)